Joseph Jude

Technology, Psychology, and Story Telling

Smart People Ask For Help. Do You Ask For Help?

Posted: Tags: learning

"Smart people ask for help", my friend Pam says it always. And she proves it with her life. She started with Father Damien Foundation in India, went on to become a consultant to European Union, United Nations and now for USAID. Listening to and observing her, I inculcated the habit of asking for help.

I now know it works and here is why it works:

  1. Smart people operate from a platform of strength: They know their strengths and put their strengths to work. Since they do their part well, they are often successful on their own. Their success attracts others to willingly extend help. After all, who wouldn’t want to join hands with winners.

  2. Smart people know their weakness: Not only they play to their strengths, they are level-headed to know what they lack. They don’t waste time working on their weakness. Rather they partner with other smart people.

  3. Smart people are self-confident: Knowing their strengths and weakness makes them confident about their abilities. They undertake projects they can achieve on their own or by complimenting themselves with other equally smart people. This sets the success in motion which enforces their self-confidence.

  4. Smart people play in a two-way street: Not only they know to seek help, they offer their helping hand too. Thus they build strong relationships. In strong relationships, there is no discussion about who gets the credit; only if everyone did their best.

  5. Smart people know its okay to be rejected: They know that not every request for help will be honored. When a request is rejected, even from a long time partner or a friend, they don’t take it personally. They know that the other person rejected their request; not them.

When was the last time you asked for help?



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